Tuesday, March 19, 2019

A Charming Story Well Told



...that's what Kirkus Reviews calls my book Dottoressa: An American Doctor in Rome, which is rolling off the presses as we speak.😃
Here are some of the specifics that caught the reviewer’s attention:
“. . . One of the first words to learn, she writes, was “pazienza,” or “patience squared,” which is “often invoked as a gentle reprimand for a foreigner’s loss of cool” and “extends beyond the prosaic ‘keep waiting’ to the philosophical.” . . . After finally gaining the official title of Dottoressa, waiting for the sole calligrapher to produce her diploma took nearly two decades. . . . The most interesting part of the book is the author’s descriptions of her alternating admiration and horror at Italian medical practices . . . Doctors almost never touch their patients, but they always listen to every word. Though they write prescriptions, the pharmacist can and will substitute another drug . . . Levenstein also demonstrates how well universal health coverage works. Italians live some of the longest, healthiest lives of anyone on the planet, mostly due to diet, accessible care, and even distribution of wealth. The author gives many illuminating examples of patient encounters . . .”

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Elevator Philosophy (Esprit de l'Ascenseur?)


“Media terrorism”: Winter red alert! It might get cold! –Nicola Bucci
My husband and I took a stroll the other day to the Palazzo Merulana, a new museum housing the Cerasi family’s collection of  Fascist-period Italian art. We entered the elevator along with a well-dressed Italian who pressed “2.” We then pressed “4,” on the chance the museum might have installed a modern elevator, the kind that can keep several destinations in its brain at once. The commoner old-fashioned Italian kind, such as the rickety cage that carries us up the five floors to our own apartment, has to be spoon-fed one stop at a time.
Neither: the elevator flew past the second story, and headed straight for the fourth. An unprecedented variation on the theme of Italian collective transport. All three of us commented with amusement, but our elevatormate took it one step further with a touch of philosophical fantasy, turning the elevator buttons into a microcosm of Italian life: “That’s what life is always like in Italy. He who speaks last wins the argument.”
After viewing a hundred paintings and sculptures, many interesting and some beautiful, I was obliged to hunt down their well-hidden bathroom. On the way in I rubbed shoulders with an Italian lady of a certain age who forewarned: “It’s not very clean” (an understatement). She added, to forestall any suspicions, “I didn’t touch anything.” But, this being Italy, she too felt that wasn’t enough, and added, “We Italians still haven’t reached a level worthy of being called civilization.”
My adoptive countryfolk always rise to one more level of generalization and one more degree of flair. And they never miss a chance to acknowledge – and mock with resigned affection – their own national foibles. Nicola Bucci, a political cartoonist, is a particular genius at putting the brilliant Italian mix of invention and provincialism into captioned images. Now my fellow art-lovers had offered up two strikes in one hour…
Strike three was awaiting me at home, in the form of a friend’s Facebook post about the latest Roman scandal. In 2011 a landowner had paid off a €55,000,000 debt to City Hall by handing over, it was reported at the time, 200 kilometers of precious nickel wire packed into a bundle. This treasure has been sitting in a vault in City Hall ever since, under the watchful 24/7 gaze of armed guards hired for the task. Until a few months ago when city officials, tipped off about a fraud by the same characters in northern Italy, opened the vault and determined that whatever it is that’s rolled up in that stash it’s worth nowhere near what was claimed – maybe €20,000 at the most. Less, I’d guess, than what they’ve been paying every month to those rent-a-cops.
The heights of fantasy in the depths of financial scams. I love Italy.
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Friday, March 1, 2019

An Extract From My Book Published As An Article


I am pleased (and, frankly, just a mite proud) to let you know that a brief extract from chapter 16 of my upcoming memoir – Dottoressa: An American Doctor In Rome – has been published, as “Endings, Beginnings,” in the Perspective section of The New England Journal of Medicine, which is generally considered the world’s top medical publication. This piece, which is mainly about the impact of one death on my medical practice, can be accessed free online by everyone. It's much more sober than most of the writing that you’ve been used to, pretty heavy in fact… I hope you’ll appreciate it anyway. To my amazement, it’s been read  by about 5000 people so far, not counting subscribers who received a paper copy in the mail!
The book itself now has a scheduled publication date, May 21st, less than three months away, and it can already be preordered in the States either through my publisher or at Amazon, and in Italy or elsewhere at Book Depository, who offer free shipping worldwide. Consider passing the word.